Monday, July 17, 2017

Post Coronet Project Roundup

I've been working on a few things in the last month...a couple of new projects, and one which I'm plugging away slowly at.

The highlight was I decided to make a pair of test trunkhose, in a bias cut, striped velvet--the same one my Brunswick doublet is made from, as I intended to wear it with that doublet.  The result?  Stripes...in multiple directions.

But first...
 With the buying of sole bend, and the gift of some hobnails, I decided I wanted to try making a pair of Caliga...Roman military sandals/boots.  I found that drafting was not remotely difficult...essentially trace a sole slightly smaller than the outline of your foot, measure up on the back to the desired height, then add straps; four small ones on the outside, and three on the inside.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

The Nauseatingly Stripy Trunkhose



This project is a pair of trunkhose, similar in style to those of the late 1560s, made of the same fabric and to wear with the same doublet as in the Brunswick suit.  The design is fairly general, not based on any one particular example, but is closest to one in the French rapier manual by Sainct Didier.  Because this particular project was intended more as a trial run, I am not worrying about documenting everything.

 

Sunday, July 2, 2017

Stolen: Dwarven Vest?

Nope…it’s a 16th century Irish inar.  While the garment appears to be too small to modern eyes, the fit is actually just right…for the style.  The inar was the “outer” garment of the Wild Irishman outfit, and was worn over the loose,tunic-like leine.  To the best that I can tell, the garment is unique to the culture.


Garment Description:

The inar is a short vest or jacketlike garment, most likely made of wool.  It is slightly fitted (primitively), has rudimentary sleeves, and a separate skirt (which is also short).  Did I mention the garment is short?  It comes to maybe hip length, with the waist seam somewhere around the sternum.  The neckline comes down almost to the sternum as well.  As such, it is a somewhat odd-looking piece of clothing, especially being worn over the extremely loose and bloused leine. 



Saturday, June 17, 2017

Project Roundup: More Irish stuff, yet another waistcoat, and dyeing

I haven't been sewing as much as I would like...for some reason, I've been more tired than usual, and it effected my motivation.  Plus, my major project was on hold until I managed to dye the silk then buy materials.  Excuses, I know.  But this will probably be fairly short.

Like before, they should be in more or less chronological order...

When I last posted a Project Roundup (my term for my "dress diary" posts, I had just finished my handsewn Irish leine...this meant that I needed to make the inar to go over it.

Image is a closeup of a Durer drawing.
The Inar.  For reference, the inar is a short, jacket like garment made of wool, and with a short, pleated skirt.  If it seems like I am stressing the word short...that's because the entire garment barely comes to my waist.

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Whose sleives hang trailing down Almost unto the shoe: the 16th Century Irish Leine


This project has been a long time coming; many (relatively) years ago, I wrote an article on 16th century clothing---my first serious research article, in fact.  It is only now that I have actually gotten around to making a suit of Wild Irish clothing, consisting of the leine and inar, as well as the shaggy brat.


The Project: 
This piece of documentation discusses bottom layer of the 16th century project….the leine.

The leine--a word translating now as shirt--appears essentially as a linen tunic, almost universally "saffron yellow", although lady's versions do appear in white, and I suspect that the lower classes might make due with natural coloured linen (ranging in colour from blue-grey to a lighter yellow[i]--I will discuss this more later).  For both sexes, pendulous or bagpipe style sleeves were the norm, as was the use of massive quantities of linen cloth.  Men, at least, wore theirs bloused over a belt, to bring the garment to knee length.

Sunday, May 7, 2017

Project roundup: Leine, waistcoats, and...stuff

So, I kind of promised that I would work on dress diaries more often...obviously, since my last blog post was over a month ago, I slacked.  Shame on me, I know.

But, here it goes.  In the last month or so, I've been working on three major projects, plus some others; testing my glove drafting (which I later taught a class on, and will write a post on later) with a trial pair in upcycled leather, sewing on the 16th century Irish Leine, and both developing a house waistcoat pattern for myself and making the first piece from it.

The photos are in approximately chronological order, and jump between projects...so pay attention:

To start, gloves.  Since I've been playing with 1560-70s Northern Europe, I wanted to work on a pattern that would be appropriate to that....it was both easier, and more challenging than I expected.  Actually drafting them wasn't that difficult...finding examples from the correct period which show any detail was.  Still, I managed, even if I'm still not certain of whether there should be a gusset into the thumb.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Plotting the Next Major Project...another 1570s Suit

So, shortly after being asked to join the Laurels in the SCA a touch over two months ago at Oerthan Winter Coronet* I decided that I needed to attempt a real masterwork project for my elevation.  My last major project, the Brunswick Germans was decent...a good trial run of techniques and getting me closer to my goal of a tailored period court suit, but not an attempted masterwork--if not the use of machine stitching, the choices of non-period fabrics was a bar to that in my mind.  But now, I can actually afford the good fabrics to do it right, rather than working primarily from stash.

So, I decided to poke around, and see what I could find for inspiration.  This was somewhat complicated by wanting to find something I could/would actually wear, but other than the Germans I have been playing with.  Eventually, I ran across a certain portrait--one Sir Edward Hastings at the age of 29, in 1573.  It is absolutely gorgeous, and I will probably do a Featured Garment post on it sooner rather than later.

ART UK 597951